Thursday, 18 August 2016

World Market for Hydraulic Pumps to Reach $10.4 Billion by 2022

http://www.mobilehydraulictips.com - According to a new report published by Allied Market Research, the global hydraulic pump market is expected to garner $10.4 billion of revenue by 2022, growing at a CAGR of 4.7% during 2016-2022. In 2015, Asia-Pacific accounted for 36.7%, followed by North America. Growth in developing countries such as China and India would primarily be supplemented by increasing use of hydraulic pumps in manufacturing, construction activities and automobiles.

Based on type, hydraulic pumps are classified as vane, piston, and gear pumps. Gear pumps dominated the market in 2015, accounting for more than 50% of the market revenue, owing to their low cost. Piston pumps are expected to be the fastest growing product, due to the component’s high efficiency, reliability, and increasing usage in high pressure application areas like mining and construction.

In 2015, the mobile segment occupied a major share of the overall market. However, the industrial segment is anticipated to grow at a faster rate during 2016-2022, owing to increasing application of hydraulic pumps in manufacturing activities in the developing economies.

Other findings include:

· In 2015, Asia-Pacific was the highest revenue-generating region for hydraulic pumps, followed by North America
· Growth in Latin America/Middle East/Africa is likely to be supplemented by increasing usage of hydraulic pumps in mining and oil extraction activities
· Gear pumps are the most commonly used hydraulic pumps worldwide
· Mobile applications were the major revenue-generating segment in 2015
· The industrial application segment would grow at a faster CAGR of 5.5% during 2016-2022

The complete report is available for purchase at https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/hydraulic-pump-market

Wednesday, 10 August 2016

Tech Giants Back Agriculture Equipment Manufacturers to Make Sustainable Solutions

Agriculture equipment are used for assistance in agriculture activities. Agriculture equipment comprise a wide range of equipment such as tractors, plough, cultivation equipment, and harvesters. The market is anticipated to grow at a moderate pace, with a CAGR of 5.9% from 2016 - 2022, to garner over $200 billion revenue by 2022.



Source: https://blog.alliedmarketresearch.com/collaboration-with-tech-giants-helps-agriculture-equipment-manufacturers-319

Tuesday, 2 August 2016

Engineering Essentials: Pressure-Control Valves

Pressure-control valves are found in virtually every hydraulic system, and they assist in a variety of functions, from keeping system pressures safely below a desired upper limit to maintaining a set pressure in part of a circuit. Types include relief, reducing, sequence, counterbalance, and unloading. All of these are normally closed valves, except for reducing valves, which are normally open. For most of these valves, a restriction is necessary to produce the required pressure control. One exception is the externally piloted unloading valve, which depends on an external signal for its actuation.

 

Relief valves


Most fluid power systems are designed to operate within a preset pressure range. This range is a function of the forces the actuators in the system must generate to do the required work. Without controlling or limiting these forces, the fluid power components (and expensive equipment) could be damaged. Relief valves avoid this hazard. They are the safeguards which limit maximum pressure in a system by diverting excess oil when pressures get too high.

Cracking pressure and pressure override —The pressure at which a relief valve first opens to allow fluid to flow through is known as cracking pressure. When the valve is bypassing its full rated flow, it is in a state of full-flow pressure. The difference between full-flow and cracking pressure is sometimes known as pressure differential, also known as pressure override.

In some cases, this pressure override is not objectionable. However, it can be a disadvantage if it wastes power (because of the fluid lost through the valve before reaching the maximum setting). This can further permit maximum system pressure to exceed the ratings of other components. (To minimize override, use a pilot-operated relief valve.)

 

Relief valves are either direct-acting or pilot-operated.


Direct-acting — A direct-acting valve may consist of a poppet or ball, held exposed to system pressure on one side and opposed by a spring of preset force on the other. In a fixed, non-adjustable, normally closed relief valve, Figure 1, the force exerted by the compression spring exceeds the force exerted by system pressure acting on the ball or poppet. The spring holds the ball or poppet tightly seated. A reservoir port on the spring side of the valve returns leakage fluid to tank.

Fig.1: Simple, direct-acting relief valve has no adjusting screw and therefore opens at a fixed, pre-set pressure as controlled by setting of compression spring.

When system pressure begins to exceed the setting of the valve spring, the fluid unseats the ball or poppet, allowing a controlled amount of fluid to bypass to reservoir, maintaining system pressure at the valve setting. The spring re-seats the ball or poppet when enough fluid is released (bypassed) to drop system pressure below the setting of the valve spring.

Because the usefulness of a fixed relief valve is limited to the single setting of its spring, most relief valves are adjustable. This is commonly achieved with an adjusting screw acting on the spring, Figure 2. By turning the screw in or out, the operator compresses or decompresses the spring respectively. The valve can be set to open at any pressure within a desired range. Aside from the adjustable feature, this valve works just like the fixed valve in Fig 1.

Spring-loaded poppet valves are generally used for small flows. They don’t leak below cracking pressure and respond rapidly, making them ideal for relieving shock pressures. They often are used as safety valves to prevent damage to components from high surge pressures, or to relieve pressure caused by thermal expansion in locked cylinders. The differential between cracking and full open pressure on spring-loaded poppet relief valves is high. For this reason they are not recommended for precise pressure control.

Fig.2: Adjustable, direct-acting relief valve blocks flow through the valve until force of system pressure on the poppet overcomes the adjustable spring force and downstream pressure.

Relief valves are also made to relieve flow in either direction. Fluid pressure at the other port acts on a shoulder on the plunger to open the valve. Another type of direct-acting relief valve has a guided piston. In this valve a sliding piston, instead of a poppet, connects the pressure and reservoir ports. System pressure acts on the piston and moves it against a spring force. As the piston moves, it uncovers a reservoir port in the valve body.

These valves have a fast response but may be prone to chatter. They can be damped to eliminate chatter, but this also slows their reaction time. They are reliable and can operate with good repetitive accuracy if flow does not vary widely. Valves with hardened-steel pistons and sleeves have a very long service life. They may leak slightly below cracking pressure unless the pistons are sealed.

Guided-piston relief valves generally are used for pressures below 800 psi, although they can be made with heavier springs for higher pressures. The heavier springs give the valve a greater differential and consequently increase the size of the valve.

A variation of the guided-piston relief valve is the differential-piston relief valve. Here, the pressure acts on an annular area (the difference between two piston areas). This annular area is smaller than the valve’s seat area. This permits the use of a lighter spring than would be needed if pressure acted on the entire seat area. These valves have a lower pressure differential than poppet or guided-piston relief valves.